Online Job Search

In addition to our exclusive job postings, you'll find that these job sites are valuable resources:

 

LinkedIn Jobs 

Harness the power of your network to uncover insights such as whom you know at a company, providing you an edge in your job search. Leverage the world’s largest professional network to build relationships and connect with opportunity.

 

Indeed 

Ssearch for jobs posted on thousands of sites as well as jobs posted directly by employers. You can set up daily emails with jobs that match your search.

 

Bridge Internships 

Ccreate a free account and search for local RI internships courtesy of the RI Student Loan Authority and the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce.

 

CareerBuilder 

One of the oldest job search sites, with millions of job postings and hundreds of thousands of employers on the hunt for potential employees. 

 

JWU Student Employment

Find an on-campus job.

EmployRI Network Online 

Managed by the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training. Good for searching local internships.

 

GoinGlobal 

Access cultural advice, traveling tips, and information on the cost of living abroad. Are you an international student interested in OPT or CPT? Use GoinGlobal to gain employment and H1B visa information and more.

 

Google Alert 

Get posted with the latest news from the companies and industries you’re interested in. 

 

Looksharp 

The largest internship and entry-level jobs marketplace dedicated entirely to students and new grads.

 

ZipRecruiter

Create a free account to browse or search for jobs.

 

INTERNSHIPS

You can also find internships on: 


Tips

The great majority of employers are honest, but it is important for you to recognize the signs of fraud so you can avoid being affected by it. Here are some tips to consider:

 

Unsolicited email

If you did not apply for a job or interview and are being emailed by an employer with a job offer this could be an indication that the job offer is fraudulent.  Moreover, if the email is not coming from a company email address but a gmail, yahoo, aol etc. then this could potentially be a scam. If you have not applied to a job or had a phone/in-person interview with an employer they should not be asking you for personal information (for e.g.: home address) or financial information (for e.g.: bank account, check routing number).

 

Resume 

It is recommended that you do not include a photograph, date of birth, social security, and street address on your resume or reveal that to an employer via email. You could include just your city and state on your resume and reveal your street address during the interview process.

 

No Payments

If you are asked to make a payment this could potentially be a sign that the employer is fraudulent. NEVER supply bank account, social security number or credit card or date of birth information. If you unexpectedly receive a large check do not deposit it in your bank. Do not perform any monetary transactions as they could potentially be attempts to scam you.

 

Watch for anonymity

If an employer is only communicating with you via email and you cannot find the address, actual company name, and contact’s profile online this could potentially be a warning sign. Also if the employer contacts you by phone but there isn’t a way for you to call them back.  If the employer claims that they are out of the country and need help in setting up their office in your area. They might claim they need help with errands such as making transactions for them. This is another sign that the job may be fraudulent. Google the employer/individual’s name with the word “scam”.

 

To Good to be True?

 If the job sounds too good to be true, it probably is (for e.g.: “no experience necessary” “earn money fast”).

Wondering if a job posting is authentic?

If you believe you have been contacted by an employer who appears to be fraudulent email EE&CS or IT


Federal Jobs

 

Evaluating Job Offers

You've been offered a job. Are you are sure the position is a good fit for you?

Before you accept a job offer, ask yourself:

  • Do the organization’s business, as well as the tasks and responsibilities of the position, match your interests and beliefs?
  • What is the working environment like? What is the “corporate culture” of the business?
  • How is the organizational structure? Does your potential manager seem like someone you would get along with?
  • What are your co-workers like?
  • What are the perks of this job, and how do they stack up to other offers? 
  • Is the salary fair?
 

salary negotiation 

Advice for new graduates.

QUintCareers

Read about the college to career transition and get other valuable information.


Career Management Course

Register for Career Management as a junior. Prepare for the transition from college to career, so you’re ahead of the competition during your internship and job search.

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Wildcat Willie

Job Listings in jwuLink

Employers are looking for you.

Over a thousand companies worldwide love working with our students, so you have exclusive access to thousands of jobs and internships posted just for JWU students.